Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Lemons were the acai bowls of the ancient Romans prized by the privileged because they were rare, and treasured for their healing powers. In fact, this coveted fruit, as well as the citron, were the only citrus fruits known in the ancient Mediterranean it took centuries for other fruits, such as oranges, limes and pomelos to spread westward from their native Southeast Asia, a new study finds. However, the citrus fruits that followed in later years weren't as exclusive as lemons and citrons, said the study's lead researcher, Dafna Langgut, an archaeobotanist at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "All other citrus fruits most probably spread more than a millennium later, and for economic reasons," Langgut, told Live Science in an email. [10 Biggest Historical Mysteries That Will Probably Never B...
7 strange but scrumptious facts about the history of the hamburger.

7 strange but scrumptious facts about the history of the hamburger.

It's something so simple, yet something so good — two tasty buns around mouthwatering meat. Yes, it's true: Hamburgers are wonderful. But what exactly makes them so wonderful? With so many parts and so many variations, it’s hard to know precisely why this dietary delight has become such an iconic part of our culture. Over the centuries — yes, centuries — the hamburger has evolved from an umami underdog to a ubiquitous food staple all across the globe. And at the center of that strange journey is some surprising insight into humanity itself (and also a tasty meat patty). Here are seven fascinating facts from across the years and continents that will make you appreciate the burger for more than just its taste. 1. The hamburger was invented in New Haven, Connecticut. ...

Jason Silva Is The Aristotle Of The Digital Age

“In the information age, you don’t teach philosophy you perform it.” That’s the motto of Jason Silva, one of the brightest young thinkers around today. Jason refers to himself as a performance philosopher and has become a modern-day YouTube star. His channel “Shots of Awe” has millions of views from people all over the world who listen intently as he expounds philosophically on the everyday issues of life.  Here, Jason Silva explains his views on the power of ideas, a very important subject matter for him. He claims that if Aristotle were alive today, he wouldn’t reach people on the streets as he did in ancient Greece, but rather through a YouTube channel. If that is correct, then Jason Silva could very well be the modern Aristotle. R...
The Selfie Isnt the Problem. We Are.

The Selfie Isnt the Problem. We Are.

Smartphones and social media are turning us into dreadful narcissists. Would anyone care to dispute this?Yes, actually. His name is Will Storr, and he’s a British journalist who’s just published Selfie: How We Became So Self-Obsessed and What It’s Doing to Us. Though the title of his book suggests otherwise, Storr says we’re missing the point when we complain about technologically induced egotism: “We all think that these things”—Twitter, Facebook, the iPhone— “have caused the self-obsession, but of course that’s not true.”The root problem, he contends, isn’t our devices or our social media sites. It’s us. Or rather, it’s the civilization we’ve built, a culture that for many decades has encouraged ever greater degrees of self-regard. Platforms like Twitter surely amplify our egocentric imp
Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Lemons were the acai bowls of the ancient Romans prized by the privileged because they were rare, and treasured for their healing powers. In fact, this coveted fruit, as well as the citron, were the only citrus fruits known in the ancient Mediterranean it took centuries for other fruits, such as oranges, limes and pomelos to spread westward from their native Southeast Asia, a new study finds. However, the citrus fruits that followed in later years weren't as exclusive as lemons and citrons, said the study's lead researcher, Dafna Langgut, an archaeobotanist at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "All other citrus fruits most probably spread more than a millennium later, and for economic reasons," Langgut, told Live Science in an email. [10 Biggest Historical Mysteries That Will Probably Never B...

Jason Silva Is The Aristotle Of The Digital Age

“In the information age, you don’t teach philosophy you perform it.” That’s the motto of Jason Silva, one of the brightest young thinkers around today. Jason refers to himself as a performance philosopher and has become a modern-day YouTube star. His channel “Shots of Awe” has millions of views from people all over the world who listen intently as he expounds philosophically on the everyday issues of life.  Here, Jason Silva explains his views on the power of ideas, a very important subject matter for him. He claims that if Aristotle were alive today, he wouldn’t reach people on the streets as he did in ancient Greece, but rather through a YouTube channel. If that is correct, then Jason Silva could very well be the modern Aristotle. R...

How to eat: lasagne

This month, How to Eat has a lasagne in the oven. But will you be eating it with salad, garlic bread, chips or even boiled potatoes?It originated in ancient Rome (as a nauseating miscellany of thrush, tripe and raisin wine), and the al forno/alla bolognese form of the dish most common in northern Europe was perfected in Emilia-Romagna. But nonetheless, in the UK, we have a deep love for lasagne. We have made this month’s How to Eat subject our own. An early version of “loseyns” features in the 14th-century English cookbook, The Forme of Cury, while, in 2016, the Good Housekeeping Institute found that, 700 years later, it was still Britain’s second most popular ready-meal. That is some staying power, and may explain why lasagne has become an unexpected bit player in so many political bridge
<em>2001: A Space Odyssey</em> Predicted the Future—50 Years Ago

2001: A Space Odyssey Predicted the Future—50 Years Ago

It was 1968. I was 8 years old. The space race was in full swing. For the first time, a space probe had recently landed on another planet (Venus). And I was eagerly studying everything I could to do with space. Then on April 2, 1968 (May 15 in the UK), the movie 2001: A Space Odyssey was released—and I was keen to see it.So in the early summer of 1968 there I was, the first time I’d ever been in an actual cinema (yes, it was called that in the UK). I’d been dropped off for a matinee, and was pretty much the only person in the theater. And to this day, I remember sitting in a plush seat and eagerly waiting for the curtain to go up, and the movie to begin. It started with an impressive extraterrestrial sunrise. But then what was going on? Those weren’t space scenes. T...
Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Lemons were the acai bowls of the ancient Romans prized by the privileged because they were rare, and treasured for their healing powers. In fact, this coveted fruit, as well as the citron, were the only citrus fruits known in the ancient Mediterranean it took centuries for other fruits, such as oranges, limes and pomelos to spread westward from their native Southeast Asia, a new study finds. However, the citrus fruits that followed in later years weren't as exclusive as lemons and citrons, said the study's lead researcher, Dafna Langgut, an archaeobotanist at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "All other citrus fruits most probably spread more than a millennium later, and for economic reasons," Langgut, told Live Science in an email. [10 Biggest Historical Mysteries That Will Probably Never B...