Month: December 2017

12 Ridiculous Jobs That Thankfully Don’t Exist Anymore

12 Ridiculous Jobs That Thankfully Don’t Exist Anymore

googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('VN_PG_DTAT_ATF'); }); Everyone complains about work every now and then. It's impossible not to. Most people are expected to undergo at least four career changes by the time they turn 32. For those of you looking for a new career path or just standing around the water cooler complaining about your current job, remember that thanks to technology and other advancements, the possibilities are endless. (After all, a "social media specialist" was not a thing a few years ago.)Although we have our fair share of bizarre jobs, these 12 occupations from the past are pretty odd, too. 1. Rat Catcher Wikimedia Commons It's pretty s...
Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Lemons were the acai bowls of the ancient Romans prized by the privileged because they were rare, and treasured for their healing powers. In fact, this coveted fruit, as well as the citron, were the only citrus fruits known in the ancient Mediterranean it took centuries for other fruits, such as oranges, limes and pomelos to spread westward from their native Southeast Asia, a new study finds. However, the citrus fruits that followed in later years weren't as exclusive as lemons and citrons, said the study's lead researcher, Dafna Langgut, an archaeobotanist at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "All other citrus fruits most probably spread more than a millennium later, and for economic reasons," Langgut, told Live Science in an email. [10 Biggest Historical Mysteries That Will Probably Never B...
Sponsors flee New York City theater company over Trump-killing scene

Sponsors flee New York City theater company over Trump-killing scene

Delta Air Lines and Bank of America became the first companies to announce that they are pulling their sponsorships of a Manhattan-based theater companys portrayal of Julius Caesar as a Donald Trump look-alike in a business suit who gets stabbed to death on stage. Delta and Bank of America both announced their intentions on Sunday. "No matter what your political stance may be, the graphic staging of Julius Caesar at this summer's Free Shakespeare in the Park does not reflect Delta Air Lines' values," the companys statement said. "Their artistic and creative direction crossed the line on the standards of good taste." Bank of America added it was withdrawing funding for the production. "The Public Theater chose to present Julius Caesar in such a way that was intended to provoke and offend," ...
Trump takes it easy on China, China, China, China…

Trump takes it easy on China, China, China, China…

**Want FOX News Halftime Report in your inbox every day? Sign up here.** On the roster: Trump takes it easy on China, China, China, China… - I’ll Tell You What: More than one way to skin a pudding - Moore accused of sex acts with teen as prosecutor - Suburban battlegrounds worry GOP for 2018 - Season’s beatings TRUMP TAKES IT EASY ON CHINA, CHINA, CHINA, CHINA… Steve Bannon is right.  Maybe not about everything in politics, but at least about the fact that Republicans can’t choose to be just a little bit Trumpy.  As Bannon explained to the NYT, President Trump’s political success requires both an embrace of divisive cultural issues, but also what Bannon has previously called &ld...
How Women Built the Little Town of Bethlehem

How Women Built the Little Town of Bethlehem

The old city of Bethlehem sits on a high thin ridge at the edge of the desert, facing the Church of the Nativity. However, the original “little town” of the Gospels once stood on the hilltop now occupied by the church and its monasteries. In effect, as the church expanded, the town was pushed on to the ridge opposite. The entire built environment of Bethlehem has been shaped by the growth of the church: and one of the more remarkable, if forgotten facts is that almost all those responsible were women.Bethlehem was a popular place of pilgrimage by the second century, but it was only when the Romans began to embrace Christianity that the fabric of the city changed. Many Roman women had amassed fortunes as heiresses, divorcees, widows, and even investors and entrepreneurs. However, this was w
Jason Silva Is The Aristotle Of The Digital Age

Jason Silva Is The Aristotle Of The Digital Age

“In the information age, you don’t teach philosophy you perform it.” That’s the motto of Jason Silva, one of the brightest young thinkers around today. Jason refers to himself as a performance philosopher and has become a modern-day YouTube star. His channel “Shots of Awe” has millions of views from people all over the world who listen intently as he expounds philosophically on the everyday issues of life.  Here, Jason Silva explains his views on the power of ideas, a very important subject matter for him. He claims that if Aristotle were alive today, he wouldn’t reach people on the streets as he did in ancient Greece, but rather through a YouTube channel. If that is correct, then Jason Silva could very well be the modern Aristotle. R...
Rare, 2,000-year-old Roman coin discovered in Jerusalem

Rare, 2,000-year-old Roman coin discovered in Jerusalem

Jerusalem (CNN)Archaeologists have discovered a gold coin in Jerusalem bearing the face of Nero, the Roman Emperor best known for playing the fiddle while Ancient Rome burned. The coin was likely struck in 56-57 AD, researchers say. The Romans took control of the city in 63 BC after what became known as the Siege of Jerusalem."The coin is exceptional because this is the first time that a coin of this kind has turned up in Jerusalem in a scientific dig," said Shimon Gibson, co-director of the excavation. "Coins of this type are usually only found in private collections, where we don't have clear evidence as to place of origin."READ MORE: Ancient Greek fort found in JerusalemOne side of the coin, known in Latin as an aureus, shows a portrait of Nero as Caesar. Many Roman emperors took the ti...
Trump Is No Orange Julius, but He Does Share Traits With Other Tyrants of Rome

Trump Is No Orange Julius, but He Does Share Traits With Other Tyrants of Rome

ROME—Donald Trump definitely is not the right model for Julius Caesar, stabbed to death by his beloved Brutus, the envious Casca, and others in the Bard of Avon’s classic play performed this year in modern dress at New York City’s annual Shakespeare in the Park festival.Delta Airlines and Bank of America pulled their funding for the event after a Twitterstorm seized on the idea that this was all a plot against POTUS, and maybe even an incitement to violence.Presumably none of those people tweeting away, including Donald Trump Jr., are familiar with the play, since Caesar is in essence its hero, and the assassins are the villains who defend the republic with murder—and thereby seal its doom.But let’s not defend the producer and director too strongly. The choice to apparel Shakespeare’s Caes
Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Lemons were the acai bowls of the ancient Romans prized by the privileged because they were rare, and treasured for their healing powers. In fact, this coveted fruit, as well as the citron, were the only citrus fruits known in the ancient Mediterranean it took centuries for other fruits, such as oranges, limes and pomelos to spread westward from their native Southeast Asia, a new study finds. However, the citrus fruits that followed in later years weren't as exclusive as lemons and citrons, said the study's lead researcher, Dafna Langgut, an archaeobotanist at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "All other citrus fruits most probably spread more than a millennium later, and for economic reasons," Langgut, told Live Science in an email. [10 Biggest Historical Mysteries That Will Probably Never B...

Police killings of favela residents continue as Games go on in Rio

85,000-member security force holds poor communities in state of semi-siege not to protect us, but to segregate us from Olympic visitors, neighbours sayWhile much of the worlds media has focused on US swimmer Ryan Lochtes fabricated account of an armed robbery, the real victims of Olympic crime in Rio de Janeiro are the citys poorest residents, caught on the frontline of conflict between the authorities and drug traffickers. Since the start of the Olympics, local media have reported at least 14 deaths in shootouts between gang members and police or soldiers from the 85,000-member security force deployed for the Games. While such high levels of violence have long been a fact of life in favela communities, many residents feel the situation has been made worse by the high-profile mega-event th...