Month: January 2018

Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Lemons were the acai bowls of the ancient Romans prized by the privileged because they were rare, and treasured for their healing powers. In fact, this coveted fruit, as well as the citron, were the only citrus fruits known in the ancient Mediterranean it took centuries for other fruits, such as oranges, limes and pomelos to spread westward from their native Southeast Asia, a new study finds. However, the citrus fruits that followed in later years weren't as exclusive as lemons and citrons, said the study's lead researcher, Dafna Langgut, an archaeobotanist at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "All other citrus fruits most probably spread more than a millennium later, and for economic reasons," Langgut, told Live Science in an email. [10 Biggest Historical Mysteries That Will Probably Never B...
A Few “Miracles” That Actually Have Totally Mundane Explanations

A Few “Miracles” That Actually Have Totally Mundane Explanations

If you want to annoy a scientist, just say the word “miracle.” That’s because most miracles aren’t exactly miraculous, per se. Every time a seemingly unexplainable event occurs, there's a strong chance that someone somewhere has put hours of blood, sweat, and tears into figuring out why. However, this demystification of the world does not necessarily make it a duller and less interesting place – far from it. What makes the world so fascinating is what we learn about it. Besides, quite often, the truth is stranger than fiction anyway. So, whether you take the view that we're raining on your parade or aiding you in your quest for knowledge, here’s a bunch of "miraculous" occurrences that turned out to be something way different.  The O...
God of War gets a release date and a snazzy new trailer

God of War gets a release date and a snazzy new trailer

Sony has a killer lineup of PlayStation 4-exclusive games planned for release in 2018, but not many of them have specific release dates yet. When will Spider-Man or Detroit: Become Human arrive? Who knows! But one of the most-anticipated games just got a meaty new trailer and an official release date. Sony announced God of War is coming to PlayStation 4 on April 20, 2018. Previous God of War games have pitted the demigod protagonist Kratos against the mythical creatures and gods of Ancient Greece. This upcoming game finds Kratos heading up north, where he encounters (and presumably kills) many well-known gods and beasts from Norse mythology. The new trailer is kind of like those movie previews that seems to show half the plot of the movie. Watch it, and you’ll have a good idea of w...
Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Lemons were the acai bowls of the ancient Romans prized by the privileged because they were rare, and treasured for their healing powers. In fact, this coveted fruit, as well as the citron, were the only citrus fruits known in the ancient Mediterranean it took centuries for other fruits, such as oranges, limes and pomelos to spread westward from their native Southeast Asia, a new study finds. However, the citrus fruits that followed in later years weren't as exclusive as lemons and citrons, said the study's lead researcher, Dafna Langgut, an archaeobotanist at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "All other citrus fruits most probably spread more than a millennium later, and for economic reasons," Langgut, told Live Science in an email. [10 Biggest Historical Mysteries That Will Probably Never B...

Jason Silva Is The Aristotle Of The Digital Age

“In the information age, you don’t teach philosophy you perform it.” That’s the motto of Jason Silva, one of the brightest young thinkers around today. Jason refers to himself as a performance philosopher and has become a modern-day YouTube star. His channel “Shots of Awe” has millions of views from people all over the world who listen intently as he expounds philosophically on the everyday issues of life.  Here, Jason Silva explains his views on the power of ideas, a very important subject matter for him. He claims that if Aristotle were alive today, he wouldn’t reach people on the streets as he did in ancient Greece, but rather through a YouTube channel. If that is correct, then Jason Silva could very well be the modern Aristotle. R...
Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Lemons were the acai bowls of the ancient Romans prized by the privileged because they were rare, and treasured for their healing powers. In fact, this coveted fruit, as well as the citron, were the only citrus fruits known in the ancient Mediterranean it took centuries for other fruits, such as oranges, limes and pomelos to spread westward from their native Southeast Asia, a new study finds. However, the citrus fruits that followed in later years weren't as exclusive as lemons and citrons, said the study's lead researcher, Dafna Langgut, an archaeobotanist at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "All other citrus fruits most probably spread more than a millennium later, and for economic reasons," Langgut, told Live Science in an email. [10 Biggest Historical Mysteries That Will Probably Never B...

Post-work: the radical idea of a world without jobs

The long read: Work has ruled our lives for centuries, and it does so today more than ever. But a new generation of thinkers insists there is an alternativeWork is the master of the modern world. For most people, it is impossible to imagine society without it. It dominates and pervades everyday life – especially in Britain and the US – more completely than at any time in recent history. An obsession with employability runs through education. Even severely disabled welfare claimants are required to be work-seekers. Corporate superstars show off their epic work schedules. “Hard-working families” are idealised by politicians. Friends pitch each other business ideas. Tech companies persuade their employees that round-the-clock work is play. Gig economy companies claim that round-the-clock work
Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Sour note: In Ancient Rome, lemons were only for the rich

Lemons were the acai bowls of the ancient Romans prized by the privileged because they were rare, and treasured for their healing powers. In fact, this coveted fruit, as well as the citron, were the only citrus fruits known in the ancient Mediterranean it took centuries for other fruits, such as oranges, limes and pomelos to spread westward from their native Southeast Asia, a new study finds. However, the citrus fruits that followed in later years weren't as exclusive as lemons and citrons, said the study's lead researcher, Dafna Langgut, an archaeobotanist at Tel Aviv University in Israel. "All other citrus fruits most probably spread more than a millennium later, and for economic reasons," Langgut, told Live Science in an email. [10 Biggest Historical Mysteries That Will Probably Never B...

Jason Silva Is The Aristotle Of The Digital Age

“In the information age, you don’t teach philosophy you perform it.” That’s the motto of Jason Silva, one of the brightest young thinkers around today. Jason refers to himself as a performance philosopher and has become a modern-day YouTube star. His channel “Shots of Awe” has millions of views from people all over the world who listen intently as he expounds philosophically on the everyday issues of life.  Here, Jason Silva explains his views on the power of ideas, a very important subject matter for him. He claims that if Aristotle were alive today, he wouldn’t reach people on the streets as he did in ancient Greece, but rather through a YouTube channel. If that is correct, then Jason Silva could very well be the modern Aristotle. R...
Netflix’s ‘The Crown’ vs. PBS’s ‘Victoria:’ Prince Philip Is Eclipsed by the Amazing Albert

Netflix’s ‘The Crown’ vs. PBS’s ‘Victoria:’ Prince Philip Is Eclipsed by the Amazing Albert

It’s tough being married to these English Queens if you want to be more than a stud. That is the lingering message after the second season of Victoria premiered on PBS.At the same time, the first two seasons of The Crown have been propelled by the serial frustrations of Prince Philip as he realizes what Elizabeth’s ailing father, George VI, meant when he warned him with ominous simplicity: “The Queen will be your job.”Now we see Victoria’s consort, Prince Albert, discovering that for him, too, her regal majesty is Job One.The simultaneous appearance of these two family sagas is providing an irresistible study in the contest of wills between two men born to the belief of natural male supremacy and two women who, granted powers unique to them, were both quick to show who was boss in the hous