The Woman Whos Conquered Rome

The Woman Whos Conquered Rome

Virginia Raggi may not be the Amal Clooney of Italy, but she’ll do. And now she’s set to be the mayor of the Eternal City. (In truth, not a job many people want.) ">ROME If VirginiaRaggi becomes mayor of Rome in a run-off election on June 19 it will be the first time in the citys 2,769-year history that a woman has led the eternal city. And if first-round voting on Sunday is any indication, it looks like history is about to be made. Raggi, 37, is a lawyer and grassroots activist who cut her teeth as a public defender for juvenile delinquents. Her noble career, her intelligence and her beauty have led the Italian press to frequent comparisons with Amal Clooney. Raggi is estranged from her husband, who works in radio and played no part in the campaign. She has a seven-year-old son, and sh
‘Strong and stable’ – Why politicians keep repeating themselves – BBC News

‘Strong and stable’ – Why politicians keep repeating themselves – BBC News

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media captionThe prime minister sticks relentlessly to her "strong and stable" slogan As the general election approaches, MPs start to repeat themselves. Over and over again. In every interview. Why do they do it?The final Prime Minister's Questions before the general election had just finished when an exasperated Paul Flynn asked the Speaker whether a microchip had been planted into Tory MPs that makes them say the words "strong and stable" every 18 seconds.The veteran Labour MP had a point - the Conservatives' slogan had just been used 16 times, including a hat-trick of mentions inside a single question by backbencher Michael Fabricant.In the 10 days since the general election was announced (with a speech outside 10 Downing Street contai...
Hanukkah surprise: Ancient coin found at Jerusalem’s Tower of David

Hanukkah surprise: Ancient coin found at Jerusalem’s Tower of David

The ancient coin found at Jerusalem's Tower of David (Tower of David Museum). An ancient coin from the time of King Antiochus IV Epiphanes, who features in the Hanukkah story, has been discovered at Jerusalems Tower of David. The Tower of David is a medieval citadel located near the Old City of Jerusalem's Jaffa Gate. The citadel, a UNESCO World Heritage site, is built on the remains of an ancient fortification. The amazing find was made during routine conservation work in the Towers archaeological garden, according to a statement from the Tower of David Museum. Orna Cohen, the Tower of Davids chief conservation officer, saw a metallic object flash among the stones of a wall. CONTENTS OF FIRST DISCOVERED PHILISTINE CEMETERY REVEALED On close inspection, the archaeologist realized t...

Downward spiral: how Venezuela’s symbol of progress became political prisoners’ hell

The dizzying spiral structure in central Caracas was conceived in the 1950s as a monument to a nations confidence but now its crumbling shell houses a notorious political prison. Is El Helicoide a metaphor for modern Venezuela?Spiralling up a hill in the heart of Caracas is a playful, ambitious building that once embodied Venezuela’s dreams of modernity, power and influence, and was fêted by Salvador Dalí and Pablo Neruda. Today, its crumbling concrete shell houses the headquarters of Venezuela’s intelligence services and the country’s most notorious political prison. It has become a symbol of national decay, bankrupt dreams and faltering democracy. Slums on the surrounding slopes obscure the aging Buckminster Fuller dome that tops its elegant coils, but the building can still be seen from
Mystery Of Sunken Confederate Submarine Finally Solved After 150 Years

Mystery Of Sunken Confederate Submarine Finally Solved After 150 Years

The H.L. Hunley was the first submarine to sink an enemy warship. On the evening on February 17, 1864 during the American Civil War, this two-bit contraption fired a torpedo against the hull of the Union ship USS Housatonic in the waters off the coast of South Carolina, sinking it within minutes. Five of the 155 souls onboard died. The eight Confederate soldiers crammed inside the submarine, however, were not seen again until they were raised from the seabed in 2000 by marine archaeologists. Bizarrely, they were still at their stations, and their skeletons had no obvious physical injuries, leading to a huge amount of speculation about what happened to the crew on that night over 150 years ago. One leading theory had been that a that a “lucky shot” from a crewmember onboar...